N E V E S

A R C H I T E C T S

Sustainability

Sustainability Design Guide
This is a far reaching issue, for the purposes of this brief guide the subject is concentrated on architectural design. When sustainability is applied architecturally there is usually an initial premium to pay, but over a period of time this investment will pay dividends both financially and environmentally.

1 Energy Conservation
Through the use of a highly insulated shell, ventilation heat recovery and passive solar design it is possible to design a house that uses zero energy for space heating. However, such insulation levels, as recommended by the Energy Saving Trust’ Best Practice’ exceed current building regulations, so they need to be part of the initial strategy.
www.est.org.uk/bestpractice
www.odpm.org

2 Embodied energy
Another aspect of energy conservation is Embodied energy. All manufactured materials and processes require energy. Naturally formed materials and processes from local sources minimise overall energy consumption, and should be carefully considered when applied within a design. Reduce>Re-use>Recycle.




3 Renewable Energy
Solar, wind and hydro. energy can be collected in a variety of ways and integrated into any building. Costs are reduced if they are incorporated from the start.

4 Installations
Solar panels
Photovoltaic (PV) panels
Passive solar design
Ground Source Heat Pumps
Wind Energy
Bio-Fuel
Combined Heat and Power (CHP) units
Rainwater harvesting

www.solartradeassociation.org.uk
www.bwea.org - British Wind Energy Ass.
www.british-hydro.org - British Hydropower
www.feta.co.uk - British Heat Pump Ass.
www.britishbiogen.co.uk - British Bio-Fuels

GOVERNMENT GRANTS
For information on grants, installation costs, energy/carbon saving and pay back times see the following websites:

www.clear-skies.org
www.est.org.uk